Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Jane Hart's top 100 tools for learning

Jane has finalised this year's top 100 tools for learning, as identified by, well... you.

The composition of this list makes it clear that there is no real boundary around tools-for-learning as opposed to tools-for-anything-else. Just about anything can be used for learning, really.

4 comments:

Harold Jarche said...

So why do educational institutions and training departments invest so much money in special tools for learning? (rhetorical question, of course)

Karyn Romeis said...

@Harold A good question, and one that is only rhetorical to those of us who have been having this conversation for years on end. For the institutions and departments in question, it's a pertinent question that demands an answer.

Peg said...

From Harold's rhetorical question, another: Why even bother with educational institutions and training departments?

Donald Clark said...

Teachers believe they are auteurs and that they should design every lesson and every course from scratch. This leads to absurd levels of duplication and low quality output. The illusion that 'tools' solve the problem is the age old illusion that Word makes a novelist or Excel an accountant or Powerpoint a good public speaker. It's the DIY craze gone mad.